17th May 2016

Marsh Harrier. These wonderful birds, abundant in East Anglia in the early 19th century, became extinct in the UK by the end of the 19th Century. Now they are on the rise again, with over a hundred females in Norfolk alone. We watched a pair on Pevensey Marsh, East Sussex,  last week. At this time of year the male makes food passes to the female in mid-air. Slow fliers, they can keep airborne at very low speeds for a big bird- less than 20mph. They are also adapting their behaviour- most still occur on moors or marshes but some are breeding among cereal crops. Back down south for a while so there will be a break in transmission! Conditions: Dry and sunny before the wet and unsettled days to come. Temperature: Max 16- Min 10c.

Male Marsh Harrier, flying low over reed-beds

Male Marsh Harrier, flying low over reed-beds

IMG_0466IMG_0451IMG_0454

Advertisements