3rd February 2017

Cedars, non-native Conifers, add little except shelter to our wildlife.  All Cedars are easy to identify, having cones that sit upright on their branches. This is the best known Cedar of Lebanon, introduced to the UK in 1638 and extensively planted in country estates by Capability Brown and others. The durable wood was used to build palaces and ships in Lebanon and Egypt, where the fragrant oils were used to help mummify bodies. Oils are and are still used as an insect repellent. We inherited a Red Cedar hedge, slower growing and vastly preferable to the commonly used Leyland Cypress. Conditions: Windy with some sun, at last, down South! Temperature: Max 9- Min 4C.

Male Flowers of Cedar of Lebanon, flowering now

Male Flowers of Cedar of Lebanon, flowering now

Cedar cones sit up on top of the branches- Cedar of Lebanon

Cedar cones sit up on top of the branches- Cedar of Lebanon

Cedar of Lebanon as typically planted in an 18th century parkland

Cedar of Lebanon as typically planted in an 18th century parkland- Ashburnham, Sussex

Cedar fo Lebanon trunk

Cedar fo Lebanon trunk

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