26th June 2020

Wild Angelica, one of the most attractive of he Carrot family, can reach a height of 8 feet and is loved by many insects. You can, of course, get a garden variety too. In the wild, Angelica loves damp places, stream edges, and woods. The only thing it could be mistaken for really is Hogweed but the leaves of Angelica smell sweetly. The umbels are often pink-tinged and are more delicate and ‘frothy’, and often more rounded than the flatter Hogweed. Angelica stems are virtually hairless, ridged and hollow and of course the garden variety can be crystallised and used on cakes and sweets. The stems are usually purplish and have big sheathes where the leaves emerge ( these occur on Hogweed too). The plant yields a good yellow dye and the seeds can be dried and used like fennel or aniseed, or to flavour liqueurs. The 17th Century botanist and herbalist Culpeper of how  a liquid made like a tissane

Angelica

Angelica

Angelica

Angelica

from Angelica “applied to places pained with the gout or sciatica doth give a great deal of ease”. Just to find a great patch of this majestic plant is a pleasure. Conditions: Humid and cloudy. Temperature: Max 27 Min 15C.

19th September 2016

Angelica, an Umbellifer (umbrella-shaped flower-heads), is often confused with the coarser Hogweed- both out for the past few weeks, similar in form and height. Angelica has purple-red stems growing from brackets, and softer, rounder flower-heads, often pinkish-purple-tinged. All parts are edible (the roots, only if cooked) and, with its unique scent and taste have been used in Gin and other Liqueurs, candied stalks and seeds for confectionary, and stewed stems and roots eaten to prevent scurvy. A distilled essential oil is still used in some toothpastes, cough mixtures, shampoos and soaps. It is a wonderful plant in the wild but also suitable for gardens- elegant and great for insects. Conditions: Calm and warm. Temperature: Max 19- Min 14C.

Angelica stem and leaf bracket

Angelica stem and leaf bracket

Angelica can grow up to 2 metres, especially in damp areas

Angelica can grow up to 2 metres, especially in damp areas

Angelica- softer, pinkish heads of flowers.

Angelica- softer, pinkish heads of flowers.

Hogweed- coarser, flatter and less colourful but insects still frequent ti

Hogweed- coarser, flatter and less colourful but insects still frequent ti