12th April 2018

Wood Sorrel- the first of the season for me, a favourite plant of damp woods, like Coed Lletywalter where we walked this morning. Its bright green trefoil leaves open in bright light and the white flowers have beautiful mauve veins. Out from around Easter, giving it its common name ‘Alleluia’,( among other common names, including Laverocks) the bruised, fresh leaves were once applied to cuts and bruises but I always loved, as a child, eating them as I played in our local woods. The oxalic acid, tasting like lemon juice, quenched my thirst. I read that Native Americans used it the same way! Conditions: Sun before high cloud. Temperature: Max 11 Min 7C.

Wood Sorrel

Wood Sorrel

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22nd March 2018

Background to the spangled Celandines and starry Wood Anemones of Catsfield hedgerows right now is the Dog’s Mercury, with fresh green stalks and leaves and green female and male spikes of flowers. Culpepper,the 17th century herbalist, described this innocent looking plant thus: “There is not a more fatal plant, native of our country, than this”. The foetid smell attracts midges which pollinate this highly poisonous plant which is avoided by wild animals and can kill slowly over weeks. ‘Dog’ is used to mean ‘worthless’ but I like to see its fresh backdrop of leaves in the woods and hedgerows in early spring. Conditions: Bitterly cold breeze amongst sun and cloud.

Dog’s Mercury

Dog’s Mercury

Dog’s Mercury

Temperatures: Max 8 Min 5C.

23rd February 2018

Goldeneye are beautiful, diving ducks that overwinter in the UK. You may see them at Old Moor; we recently watched them on the Northumberland sea and at Druridge Bay, a bit distant so I have drawn a male to add to the photo’s

Goldeneye male

. Males have iridescent heads- studies suggest iridescence is related to testosterone levels, which may explain why heads look blacker in winter. The white cheek patch helps identification. Goldeneye first nested in Scotland in 1970nest-boxes in trees near lakes has increased the small number of breeding to 200 pairs. Conditions: Cold with some sun. Temperature: Max 4 Min -2C.

Goldeneye male

Goldeneye, male

Goldeneye male

30th January 2018

Reed Bunting- about the size of a sparrow but longer and more slender, this lovely bird was in some numbers at Old Moor RSPB reserve today. Feeding on seeds and insects, and traditionally a wetland bird, the Reed Bunting is now spreading out into farmland, where it particularly enjoys the seed of Oilseed Rape, it can even turn up on garden feeders through winter. Like some other species, the Reed Bunting will feign injury to draw predators away from their nests. Conditions: Sunny and still Temperature: Max 7- Min 3C.

Male Reed Bunting

Male Reed Bunting

Female Reed Bunting

Male Reed Bunting

2nd September 2017

Hemp Agrimony (neither related to the much smaller Yellow Agrimony nor to Hemp!) is a brilliant wild plant for late summer and autumn- attracting many insects, Butterflies and Moths. Impressive in size (3-5 feet, 1-2 metres,) with large, frothy flowerheads, this plant loves damp grassland, ditches, marshes and damp woodland edges. Nick- named ‘Raspberries and Cream’ from its appearance, there are smaller versions of these eupatoriums

Hemp Agrimony

Hemp Agrimony

– like ‘Baby Joe’– which would be great for autumn wildlife in a smaller garden. Conditions: Sun and cloud. Temperature: Max 19- Min 12C.

15th July 2017

The Banded Demoiselle– it was such a treat to watch many of this beautiful, petrol blue Damselfly along the Chesterfield Canal. On the wing from May to August this stunning insect lives on still or slow flowing waters, in England and Wales. Unmistakable, this is a large Damselfly, over 4cm long with a wingspan of her 6cm. The bronze and green coloured female lays the eggs on marginal plants under water, breathing by trapping air between its wings, while the male watches on and guards her. As with Dragonflies, the eggs hatch and the larvae live underwater for two years, predating insects, before climbing out onto a leaf or stem and emerging from the larval case, during off and flying off. Condition: Rain and cloud. Temperature: Max 20- Min 17C.

Male Banded Demoiselle

Male Banded Demoiselle

Banded Demoiselle -male

Female Banded Demoiselle

14th July 2017

Ringlet Butterflies love damp grasslands and brambly hedgerows so we saw several while walking along the beautiful Chesterfield Canal near Drakeholes yesterday. Being dark brown they warm up quickly and so can be seen, on their bobbing flight, even on cloudy days. Distinguished from the related Meadow Brown by the rings on the wings, these are older, adults- younger ones are darker, velvety chocolate brown. Extending their range recently, they are more common than most UK butterflies, the caterpillars feeding on common, tough grasses like Cockscomb and Couch grass. Conditions: Breezy with sunny intervals. Temperature: Max 18- Min 13C.

Ringlet butterfly

Ringlet Butterfly feeding on thistle

Ringlet butterfly feeding on Ragwort