20th August 2017

Brown Hawker Dragonfly- A common and easily identified Dragonfly, seen into autumn in gardens, woodland rides and well away from water, as well as by still or slow-flowing water, where it lays its eggs.  The bronze coloured wings and

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

brown body, with yellow patches on the thorax are easy to pick up as this fast, big hawker catches insects on the wing, or hovers or even flies backwards. Conditions: Sunny intervals. Temperature: Max 18- Min 14C.

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

10th August 2017

Brimstone Butterfly– one of the few UK butterflies which overwinter as adults, I’ve been watching this beautiful female which will have emerged from eggs laid by the overwintering generation. They will be around feeding all autumn, building up for their hibernation. Opinion is divided as to whether the colour of the much more yellow male of this species (see other photo) gave rise to the generic name of ‘butter’-fly, but male and female are both beautiful and distinctly shaped. The caterpillars rely on buckthorn and alder buckthorn so please grow either in your patch if you can (Can be bought from Ashridge Nurseries mail order) Conditions– sunny intervals. Temperature: Max 20- Min 11C.

Female Brimstone butterfly feeding on Knapweed

Female Brimstone butterfly

Male Brimstone Butterfly feeding on Scabious

7th August 2017

Green Woodpeckers- I have been lucky, while down in Sussex, to watch our largest woodpecker, the Green Woodpecker, feeding in the neighbouring field. They eat about 2,000 ants a day throughout summer, diversifying to other insects and seeds during winter. They dig into anthills with their powerful bills and capture the ants with their long, sticky tongues. Males are distinguishable from females by having a red centre to their black ‘moustaches’. Nesting in holes in trees, they use their wonderful ‘yaffle’, laughing call to delineate their territory. Conditions: Cloud with some sun. Temperature: Max 20- Min 13 C.

Male Green Woodpecker

Male Green Woodpecker

Female Green Woodpecker

5th August 2017

Small Copper: We are lucky to have this small. bright, active butterfly in our garden sometimes, especially this year on the Marjoram. Present in many areas, in small colonies, they move fast, flashing orange/copper and are best identified when settled. Males aggressively hold territories, basking on bare ground or stones, and chasing off any approaching insects, before resettling on the same spot. Loving unimproved grassland, a declining habitat, it isn’t surprising that their numbers are sadly declining, too. Conditions: Sun and showers. Temperature: Max 21- Min 10C.

Small Copper

Small Copper

Small Copper

Small Copper

27th July 2017

Rowan berries provide high energy food for many in the Thrush family, including this female Blackbird stripping our tree. Mountain Ash/ Rowan was thought by the ancient Greeks to represent an eagle battling evil, the leaves recalling the feathered eagle-wings and the red berries, spots of shed blood. In Scotland it was widely planted beside houses to ward off evil and witches. The hard wood has been used for divining rods, spinning wheels and tool handles while pieces of wood were carried as charms against rheumatism. The flowers feed many insects and the

Female Thrush balancing to reach Rowan berries

Female Blackbird packs her bill with Rowan berries

Female Blackbird flies to and fro our Rowan, with bill-fills of Rowan berries

An all-round great plant for wildlife. Conditions: Rain, sun and cloud. Temperature: Max 18- Min 13C.

24th July 2017

The small, beautiful Holly Blue butterfly,  the only blue we get in our garden and the one you are most likely to see in parks and gardens in England and Wales, flitting low and fast, is back feeding on our flowers. Numbers of Holly Blue fluctuate greatly, thought to be due to the variable numbers of the parasitic wasp which lays its eggs in their caterpillars. The caterpillars feed on holly as the name suggests, but also on dogwood, spindle, snowberry and other common bushes. The female has a dark edge to the wing. Conditions: cloudy after heavy rain. Temperature: Max 19- Min 13 C.

Female Holly Blue

Holly Blue

Female Holly Blue butterfly

11th July 2017

Red Admiral- such an easily recognised butterfly, but only a small proportion are native, with increasing numbers overwintering in the UK, mostly in the milder south. The vast majority migrate here from Central Europe and even travel as far as Orkney and the Shetlands. The long journey might explain the faded,

Red Admiral

Red Admiral

tattered state of this adult on our Buddleia. That the numbers of this butterfly, whose caterpillars feed on nettles and hops, fluctuate so widely is due to the variation in migration patterns each year. They fly late into autumn, feeding on Ivy flowers and rotting fruit. Conditions: Very wet, mild day! Temperature: Max 15- Min 12C.

Red Admiral