5th January 2020

Grey Heron- On a still, grey New Year’s Day at Rye Nature Reserve we watched this statuesque mature Heron stalking the shallow waters, among diminutive Redshank. Last autumn I featured an immature Heron and the colouring, size and length of crest and chest feathers are all more striking in adults like this. They have an ancient appearance and sure enough, 7 million year-old fossils bearing a close resemblance to today’s Heron’s have been excavated. They also have an aloof bearing which may account for the ancient Romans believing Heron’s to be birds of divination.  They

Mature Grey Heron

were also prized as food in the past. When George Neville became Archbishop of York in 1465 400 Heron’s were served up to guests! Conditions: Dry with some sun. Temperature: Max 9 Min 5C.

11th November 2019

Goldcrest

The Woodcock Moon– a friend reminded me today (thanks Jude) that the wonderful full moon we have had is called the Woodcock Moon, based on a long-held belief that the thousands of Woodcock, which travel thousands of miles at this time of year from Latvia and Scandinavia to our eastern shores, use the November full moon to navigate. The jury is our but they certainly arrive in numbers now. It reminded me of an ancient belief, certainly not true, that the migrating Goldcrests and Firecrests, our smallest birds, the native population of which is swelled by similar long-distance journeys over the North Sea, rode on the back of Woodcock. No-one could believe this tiny bird could fly that far in such conditions on their own- but they do. Conditions: Another worryingly wet day, especially for areas of Lincolnshire and South Yorkshire already under 10 inches of floodwater. Temperature: Max 4 Min 3c. 

7th November 2019

We are out on the extreme East coast, at Spurn Point Nature Reserve and it is wild, windy and wet, so here are some Dark-bellied Brent Geese that we have been watching and listening to over the last few days, days which have see-sawed between wild and wet, and calm and bright. These beautiful, small geese (a little larger than Mallard) have migrated here, in family groups, from the boggy arctic tundra of Russia, where they breed. 91,000 Dark-bellied Brent geese migrate to marshes and coastal farmland along our East and South coasts before making their way back, via the Baltic coasts, to the arctic by June, as the ice begins to thaw. Whether this pattern will be sustained as  global warming changes the nature of the tundra and the shapes of our coasts is in question-walking the land-edge yesterday there were many places where the low ‘cliff’ had been recently eroded by several metres, and Spurn Point itself now gets partially underwater at high tide. It is also an irony that The Brent Goose ‘gave’ its name to the vast ‘Brent System’ oilfield that extracts

Dark-bellied Brent Goose

Dark-bellied Brent Geese

Dark-bellied Brent Geese

oil from the North Sea and pipes it ashore in Shetland. Conditions: Torrential rain, and high NE winds. Temperature: Max 9 Min 7C.

4th July 2019

Heartease, or Wild Pansy-  one of my mum’s favourite flowers, and mine, so it was lovely to come across patches of them on one of their favourite settings- sand dunes- recently. They also appear on cultivated, sandy soils. The colour-patterns vary and it is easy to see why they are also called ‘Viola Tricolour”.  ‘Pansy’ comes from the French, “pensee”, “to think” and Louis the XV decorated the coat of arms of his favourite advisor, Francois Quesnay’, who he called his ‘thinker’ with these little gems. Heartease has long been used in herbal remedies, for skin conditions, chest complaints, as an anti-inflammatory and a diuretic. It also has a long association with grief. Shakespeare, in Hamlet, has Ophelia strewing herbs after the death of he father, saying ” And there is pansies, that’s for thoughts”. Conditions: Warm, with sunny intervals. Temperature: Max 22 Min 12C.

Heartease

Heartease, or Viola Tricolour

Heartsease

29th June 2019

Bottlenose Dolphins on the Moray Firth. One of the very special things we did on our recent Scottish holiday was to watch the Bottlenose Dolphins at Chanonry Point on the Black Isle, Moray Firth. Unless you are lucky, this takes patience but the rewards are wonderful- here are some photo’s of the mother and calf we watched catching a large fish, which the mother threw into the air by flicking her tail fluke. They do this to stun the fish before eating. A nursing mother needs to eat 8%of her body weight each day , and young can suckle up to two years and stay with the mother 3-6 years. There is a colony of about 130 Bottlenose Dolphins along the Moray Firth and they are the

Mother and calf Bottlenose Dolphin

Bottlenose Dolphin catching a large fish

Bottlenose Dolphin with its catch

The Bottlenose flips its catch into the air to stun it

Bottlenose takes a jump after feeding

Bottlenose Dolphin calf tries a jump, too

most northern colony in the world. Because they have to survive in the cold north sea they are larger than other Bottlenose, needing extra fat and blubber to live in these waters. Conditions in Sheffield: Extremely hot, still day. Temperature today: Max 30C Min 15C.

27th June 2019

Great Skua or Bonxie

Great Skua or Bonxie

Arctic Skua

Arctic Skua

Skuas– another couple of wonderful sightings from our Scotland /Orkney June trip, the Great and Arctic Skuas are predatory birds which will harass other birds, forcing them to release their catch of fish– they are sometimes called ‘piratical’ for this habit. Great Skuas, also known as ‘Bonxie’ In Scotland, will even tackle birds as large as Gannets and have been known to attack and eat Puffins as well as carrion. The Arctic Skua, now sadly on the endangered ‘red’ list, are very agile birds, flying fast and low, twisting and turning to harass birds to release their catch of fish- this one appeared over the coastal slope in front of me before zooming off across the heather. Conditions today in Sheffield: Warm and sunny Temperature: Max 21 Min 11C 

22nd June 2019

Red-breasted Mergansers, which can be seen all round the uk in winter, only  breed in the north of the UK, which explains why I have never seen their fascinating mating display until watching these (a long way off!) on a sea-loch in Orkney recently. The males (they appear to already be moulting their green heads, which they do after May-time) compete with each other for a female’s attention by doing ‘power-swimming’ beside each other, stretching their necks and then dipping their neck

Displaying Merganser

Displaying Red-breasted Merganser

Displaying Merganser

Red-breasted Merganser

Displaying Red-breasted Merganser

and breast in the water, with bills open, calling (see photo’s). Mergansers are saw-bills, so named after their serrated bills, which help them catch the salmon and trout and other fish they dive for. Conditions: Sunny intervals Temperature: Max 20 Min 11 C.