28th September 2019

Treecreeper- this is usually a solitary and elusive bird, so well camouflaged on the bark of trees and among the leaves that it is hard to get a good look at one. I was really lucky to have this one briefly come down to the edge of a friend’s pond last week. Though its body is no longer than that of a Wren, its long, down-curved, slim bill and its long, stiff tail, which helps it balance while climbing up tree trunks, make it look bigger. The bill has evolved to prise insects, grubs and spiders out of crevices in tree-trunks, where it feeds. This photo shows the very long toes and claws which help it grip as it busily travels, always upwards and often in a spiral, round a tree before flying off to feed elsewhere

Tree Creeper

Tree Creeper

. Conditions: Heavy showers and some bright spells. Temperature: Max 16 Min 12C.

24th September 2019

Painted Lady Butterfly: I blogged about these beautiful butterflies earlier in the year, as it is one of their mass migration years- an estimate of over 1 million have migrated here from North Africa and Southern Europe this year. Never overwintering in any form in cold climates, these stunning individuals, born here recently, were feasting on Verbena and other late summer flowers at Thornbridge Hall gardens in the Peak District last week. Shortly, they will begin their staggering migration back to North Africa. some may even cross the Sahara. Known in Latin as ‘Vanessa Cardui’ or Thistle Butterfly, the caterpillars will have fed on thistles and other local plants before building a silk tent, and emerging from their chrysalis-form. Look out for them, and their wonderf

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

Painted Lady

ul markings, both on upper and lower wings- they will soon be gone south. Conditions: Very wet and grey. Temperature: Max 17 Min 12C.

22nd September 2019

Male Chaffinch

Male Chaffinch, bathing

Male Chaffinch

Chaffinches are one of our most common and widespread birds, often seen feeding on the ground around cafes, boldly picking up crumbs, or in gardens around feeders. Males are more colourful than females or juveniles but the distinguishing feature for all Chaffinches is the white wing bars, visible at rest and when flying. Watching this Male washing in a friend’s  pond was lovely. Although quite restrained when bathing, compared to some birds, it revealed the range of colours, including the beautiful olive green lower back which is often not seen when watching the birds feeding, and the white tail bars. Conditions: the first rain for a few days after a spell of gorgeous sun and blue skies. Temperature: Max 18 Min 12C.

18th September 2019

There is a juvenile Grey Heron fishing regularly on Monyash village pond where, incidentally, there are numerous breeding Goldfish, as well as native fish, due to someone in the past unadvisedly dumping their pets, which now thrive several generations on. This is probably a second year juvenile as, though it hasn’t yet got the glossy feathers and black markings of a fully adult bird, it does have the beginnings of a

Heron, juvenile

Heron, juvenile

Heron, juvenile

Heron, juvenile

. Even though not fully mature, its wingspan is huge, as the photos show. Conditions: Sun and cloud. Temperature: Max 15 Min 8C.

16th September 2019

Common Frog, with mouth open and tongue extending for its prey

Common Frog in process of swallowing

Common Frog

The Common Frog’s sticky tongue. I was watching a Crane fly (daddy longlegs) skipping along the surface of a friend’s pond the other day, when this Common Frog, previously invisible, popped its head out of the water and, in an instance captured the Crane Fly. When I looked at the photo’s I had caught something I had never seen before in real life- the inside of a frog’s strange mouth and its tongue. The frog has evolved something we human have never been able to invent yet, a substance, the saliva, that can change from being very thin and fluid, for catching the prey, then very viscous and sticky for holding onto it before returning to being thin to relate the prey in its mouth so the frog can swallow it, all in a split second. The tongue is also very soft, allowing it to rapidly change dimensions– from being inside the mouth to extending a third of the length of the frog’s body, the equivalent of ou

Crane Fly, Daddy Longlegs

The frog appears

r tongue reaching our belly button! As you can see from the photo’s, in the process of swallowing the Frogs eyes move up and down, too! An extraordinary creature all round. Conditions: Cool and mostly cloudy. Temperature: Max 14 Min 7C.

13th September 2019

Chiffchaff- these birds are very similar in appearance to their close cousins, the Willow Warbler. Both migrate here from Africa and both are small, olive-green warblers with a yellow eye-stripe. In spring and early summer they are easy to tell apart by their calls- the Willow Warbler has a lovely long trill while the Chiffchaff is named after its two-note call. At this time of year, as they feed-up on insects, spiders and some berries, ready for their long migration back to Africa, you have to get a good view. It has taken me years to get a photo of Chiffchaffs but this pair were flitting up in a tree yesterday, and on a Cotoneaster bush, and you can see their distinguishing dark legs (The Willow Warbler has pale pink

Chiffchaff

Chiffchaff

Chiffchaff

Chiffchaff

ish legs). Conditions: Sun, cloud and a cool breeze. Temperature: Max 16 Min 7C.

9th September 2019

Juvenile Goldfinch- Like many juvenile birds, the young Goldfinch can be confusing and hard to identify. Male and female adult Goldfinch have very similar plumage- the male has a slightly longer bill but this is hard to distinguish, unless you spot one eating teal seeds- only male bills are long enough to extract them! Juvenile birds often have less bright colouring than the adults and the Goldfinch is no exception. This is probably an evolutionary factor to ensure the young birds are more camouflaged, being more vulnerable until they are self-sufficient in feeding and more able at flying. After their first

Juvenile Goldfinch

Juvenile Goldfinch

Adult and Juvenile Goldfinch

moult, they begin to get their adult bright feathers but even then the gold wing flashes and black and white wing ‘ladders’ show first, before the red and black caps develop. We have both feeding at present, so you can see the difference between juvenile and adult. Conditions: Cloud and rain. Temperature: Max 13 Min 9C.