20th August 2017

Brown Hawker Dragonfly- A common and easily identified Dragonfly, seen into autumn in gardens, woodland rides and well away from water, as well as by still or slow-flowing water, where it lays its eggs.  The bronze coloured wings and

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

brown body, with yellow patches on the thorax are easy to pick up as this fast, big hawker catches insects on the wing, or hovers or even flies backwards. Conditions: Sunny intervals. Temperature: Max 18- Min 14C.

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

18th August 2017

Yellowhammer- these beautiful members of the bunting family, like many birds that rely heavily on farmland seeds and stubble-fields, are declining so much they are now on the red (for danger) list. Farmers who leave hedges to fruit and seed, and some field margins with seeding wild flowers, can help. Yellowhammers nest near or on the ground, in dense vegetation, and need singing posts like trees or bushes from which to call their ‘little-bit-of-bread-and-no-cheese’ refrain. We watched these males near the Chesterfield canal- wonderfully bright. Conditions: Sunny intervals turning stormy. Temperature: Max 18- Min 12C.

Yellowhammer

Yellowhammer

Yellowhammer

Yellowhammer

14th August 2017

Common Blue Butterfly– I have been watching this, our most widespread but still declining blue butterfly, while down South but it can be seen on grasslands, in urban cemeteries, on dunes, and as far north as Orkney, though it avoids mountain terrain. The female has mostly brown upper sides, with a varying amount of blue, while males are completely blue on their upper wings- see photo’s. The jewel-like patterning of the underwings are beautiful but make them hard to spot- stand in a grassy area, when it is sunny, and just watch to see if any fly around- t

Male Common Blue on Knapweed

Male Common Blue

Female Common Blue

Female Common Blue

he best way to spot them. Conditions: Sunny intervals and showers. Temperature: Max 18- Min 14C.

12th August 2017

Hoverflies- there are 5,000 species of these harmless, true flies, many of which mimic wasps and bees as a deterrence to predators which are misled into believing they will sting if attacked. Many are hard to identify but this large and colourful one, which mimics the Hornet, is easier than most. Volucella Zonaria turned up in the south of England in the 1940’s and is spreading north, often found in suburbs and city gardens, I watched these in a Sussex garden last week. Many hoverflies are really helpful to gardeners, feeding on pests like aphids. Conditions: Sunny intervals Temperature: Max 19- Min 12C

Volucella Zonaria- Hoverfly that mimics the Hornet

Volucella Zonaria

10th August 2017

Brimstone Butterfly– one of the few UK butterflies which overwinter as adults, I’ve been watching this beautiful female which will have emerged from eggs laid by the overwintering generation. They will be around feeding all autumn, building up for their hibernation. Opinion is divided as to whether the colour of the much more yellow male of this species (see other photo) gave rise to the generic name of ‘butter’-fly, but male and female are both beautiful and distinctly shaped. The caterpillars rely on buckthorn and alder buckthorn so please grow either in your patch if you can (Can be bought from Ashridge Nurseries mail order) Conditions– sunny intervals. Temperature: Max 20- Min 11C.

Female Brimstone butterfly feeding on Knapweed

Female Brimstone butterfly

Male Brimstone Butterfly feeding on Scabious

7th August 2017

Green Woodpeckers- I have been lucky, while down in Sussex, to watch our largest woodpecker, the Green Woodpecker, feeding in the neighbouring field. They eat about 2,000 ants a day throughout summer, diversifying to other insects and seeds during winter. They dig into anthills with their powerful bills and capture the ants with their long, sticky tongues. Males are distinguishable from females by having a red centre to their black ‘moustaches’. Nesting in holes in trees, they use their wonderful ‘yaffle’, laughing call to delineate their territory. Conditions: Cloud with some sun. Temperature: Max 20- Min 13 C.

Male Green Woodpecker

Male Green Woodpecker

Female Green Woodpecker

6th August 2017

Stinkhorn- this very recognisable, woodland fungus smells so terrible that if you don’t see it first you might be drawn to it by the smell! It so embarrassed Victorians that some, including Darwin’s granddaughter Etty, went out at dawn, (when the fungi are freshly emerged, growing quickly  from an egg-shaped white dome), and bludgeoned them to pieces in a vain attempt to prevent their spread, or them being seen by young women walking the woods! The dreadful smell attracts flies

Stinkhorn

which, walking on the olive-green glabus cap, then

Stinkhorn

spread the spores via their feet. Conditions: Sunny, blue-skied day. Temperature: Max 20- Min 12C.