31st August 2017

Red Bartsia- this unassuming little plant that you can find growing low, often scarcely visible, on grassland, margins of tracks and waste ground illustrates the extraordinary intricacies of evolution, as well as the vulnerabilities of interdependent species. Declining through pasture improvement and loss of unkempt spaces, it is semi-parasitic, partly feeding off grass roots, but one small bee has evolved to feed off it- the Red Bartsia Bee. Red Bartsia’s use in the past to treat toothache gave rise to its Latin Name: Odontites Verna. Now I know about the bee I will look out for it! Conditions: Occasional showers. Temperature: Max 18- Min 11C.

Red Bartsia

Red Bartsia

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Carline Thistle- walking on the limestone Cleve Hill, it was good to see these very prickly,low-growing thistles that always look dead but are alive, made up of brown florets surrounded by golden bracts. Still carried in some parts of Europe as protectors from harm, they are named after Charlemagne, who was said to have been told by an angel that Carline Thistle would protect his army, who were dying from plague. Conditions: cloud and sun. Temperature: Max 18- Min 12 c.

Carline Thistle

22nd August 2017

Parasol Mushrooms are out in fields near woodland, woodland glades, pastureland and sometimes on stable dunes, from now till November, if we are free of frosts. Edible, and best picked when just opening and cooked when very fresh, it is best to check online or in book references for similar species, unless you know your toadstools! Dramatic-looking, it is easy to spot when mature as it is a  large fungus standing upright on a tall stalk. Conditions: Cloudy and mild. Temperature: Max 20- Min 16C.

Parasol Mushroom

Parasol Mushroom

Parasol Mushroom

20th August 2017

Brown Hawker Dragonfly- A common and easily identified Dragonfly, seen into autumn in gardens, woodland rides and well away from water, as well as by still or slow-flowing water, where it lays its eggs.  The bronze coloured wings and

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

brown body, with yellow patches on the thorax are easy to pick up as this fast, big hawker catches insects on the wing, or hovers or even flies backwards. Conditions: Sunny intervals. Temperature: Max 18- Min 14C.

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

Brown Hawker Dragonfly

18th August 2017

Yellowhammer- these beautiful members of the bunting family, like many birds that rely heavily on farmland seeds and stubble-fields, are declining so much they are now on the red (for danger) list. Farmers who leave hedges to fruit and seed, and some field margins with seeding wild flowers, can help. Yellowhammers nest near or on the ground, in dense vegetation, and need singing posts like trees or bushes from which to call their ‘little-bit-of-bread-and-no-cheese’ refrain. We watched these males near the Chesterfield canal- wonderfully bright. Conditions: Sunny intervals turning stormy. Temperature: Max 18- Min 12C.

Yellowhammer

Yellowhammer

Yellowhammer

Yellowhammer

14th August 2017

Common Blue Butterfly– I have been watching this, our most widespread but still declining blue butterfly, while down South but it can be seen on grasslands, in urban cemeteries, on dunes, and as far north as Orkney, though it avoids mountain terrain. The female has mostly brown upper sides, with a varying amount of blue, while males are completely blue on their upper wings- see photo’s. The jewel-like patterning of the underwings are beautiful but make them hard to spot- stand in a grassy area, when it is sunny, and just watch to see if any fly around- t

Male Common Blue on Knapweed

Male Common Blue

Female Common Blue

Female Common Blue

he best way to spot them. Conditions: Sunny intervals and showers. Temperature: Max 18- Min 14C.

12th August 2017

Hoverflies- there are 5,000 species of these harmless, true flies, many of which mimic wasps and bees as a deterrence to predators which are misled into believing they will sting if attacked. Many are hard to identify but this large and colourful one, which mimics the Hornet, is easier than most. Volucella Zonaria turned up in the south of England in the 1940’s and is spreading north, often found in suburbs and city gardens, I watched these in a Sussex garden last week. Many hoverflies are really helpful to gardeners, feeding on pests like aphids. Conditions: Sunny intervals Temperature: Max 19- Min 12C

Volucella Zonaria- Hoverfly that mimics the Hornet

Volucella Zonaria