26th February 2017

Black-headed gulls are in the process of regaining their black (more chocolate-brown really) heads. These noisy and sociable gulls can be seen in almost every park and lake in the UK. Losing the dark colouring in winter, you can see all stages of their plumage-change at present, among different individuals. I was photographing these on Galley Hill, when a young man stopped his cycle-ride to ask what I was photographing. 

Dark head almost full on this individual

Dark head almost full on this individual

This individual is getting its breeding plumage

This individual is getting its breeding plumage

This one is starting to get it's breeding plumage

This one is starting to get it’s breeding plumage

This Black-headed Gull is still in winter plumage

This Black-headed Gull is still in winter plumage

He frightened the gulls away but never mind- he hadn’t realised they change over the seasons. He cycled off, then returned up-hill to ask if it was true of males and females- it is!  Conditions: Heavy cloud, high winds and rain later. Temperature: Max 11- Min 7C.

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24th February 2017

Fieldfare, a winter thrush which, like the Redwing, migrates to the UK between October and April, from Scandinavia and Iceland. I watched a small mixed flock hunting insects and worms on their favourite rough grazing, this morning. I couldn’t get good photo’s so include my drawing, to show how much bigger the Fieldfare is than the Redwing. Fieldfare’s are described as having a loud ‘chuckle’, very distinctive– go to the RSPB website to hear this and all uk bird calls and songs. Fieldfares are on the red (endangered) list. Conditions: Glorious sunny morning. Temperature: Max 8- Min 3C.

Fieldfare (above) and Redwing

Fieldfare (above) and Redwing

Fieldfare, in front and Redwing, behind, feeding on insects

Fieldfare, in front and Redwing, behind, feeding on insects

Redwing feeding

Redwing feeding

22nd February 2017

Snowdrops are gracing our gardens and parks, and this is the best time to buy and plant any of the many varieties- in the green. An excellent on-line nursery for them, which grows its own plants, has free p and p this week (on orders over £20.00- code PP420)- Ashridge Trees- great for edible hedges, fruit bushes and lots more, too. Unlike Daffodils, don’t dead-head Snowdropsants gather the seeds, plac them in their nurseries, where the emerging larvae feed on their sticky coating. The ant’s faeces help fertilise the intact seeds, which then grow into new plants in another part of the garden! Conditions: Blustery, with sunny intervals. Temperature: Max 10- Min 6C.

Snowdrop

Snowdrop

Snowdrops, Penhurst

Snowdrops, Penhurst

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20th February 2017

Helping Long-Tailed Tits, which start making their nests early. Astonishingly, they need 1,500- 2,500 downy feathers to line every nest. If you can get hold of any feathers, put them out in a feeder or net with small enough mesh to contain them and big enough for the Long-tailed Tits to collect them. As well as helping them, it is fun watching them gathering as many as they can at once, as these photo’s in our garden show. Condition: Mild and cloudy. Temperature: Max 12- Min 8C.

Long Tailed Tits

Long Tailed Tits

Long Tailed Tit

Long Tailed Tit

Long Tailed Tit

Long Tailed Tit

17th February 2017

Hazel- the familiar, lemon-coloured catkins appear in January and February, long before the leaves. Look more carefully on the same stems and you will find the tiny, red, female flowers. These are fertilised by the clouds of wind-blown pollen from the ‘lambs-tail’ catkins. The pollen is hard for bees to collect- being wind-pollinated, the pollen is not sticky as it is for insect-pollinated plants, so each grain resists adhering to the next. Hazel is very useful to other wild-life and people have used it for millennia, especially valuing its flexible growth when young and its straight stems for walking sticks and bean poles, hurdles and handles when coppiced. Conditions: Mild and cloudy. Temperature: Max 11- Min 7C.

Hazel catkin and female flower

Hazel catkin and female flower

Hazel female flower

Hazel female flower

Hazel Catkins

Hazel Catkins

Catkin

Catkin

15th February 2017

Goldcrest,- weighing the same as a 20 pence piece, the UK’s smallest bird is back in our garden and their call is worth listening out for. Usually eating insects on and around  conifers, these stunning, very active, ‘busy’ birds venture into gardens more in cold winters. Their call is so sweet and high-pitched it is beyond some people’s hearing range- described as “Siii Siii” (!), if you can’t hear it, look out for it among conifers any time of year- flitting through vegetation, picking at small insects. Conditions: Still, light cloud. Temperature: Max 9- Min 5C.

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

Goldcrest

13th February 2017

Adult male Siskin

Adult male Siskin

Siskin

Siskin

Adult male Siskin

Adult male Siskin

Female Siskin

Female Siskin

Siskins are back on our feeders. These beautiful and agile finches, about the size of a Blue Tit, only appear here and on most garden bird-feeders after New Year, boosted by winter migrants, but they are a joy to  watch. Feeding naturally on Alder and Conifer (especially Sitka Spruce) seeds, they come into gardens when seeds are scarce and especially on wet days, when cones close up, which is therefore the best time to see them in your garden. Conditions: Milder and lighter cloud. Temperature: Max 6 Min 2C.