14th April 2016

There are two forms of common Primrose plants:  In Pin-eyed Primroses, a green ‘pin-shaped’ stigma or female part is visible, while  Thrum-eyed (this may be from Old English Thrum meaning loose thread or fringe- my theory!) have a cluster of pollen covered anthers visible. If you look carefully, some way down the flower tube, you will see the anthers below the  stigma, in the Pin-eyed, and the stigma below the anthers in the Thrum-eyed. As long-tongued insects, (like those few species of Butterflies which overwinter as adults in this country, such as Brimstone or Peacock),  visit

Thrum-eyed Primrose

Thrum-eyed Primrose

Thrum-eyed Primrose

Thrum-eyed Primrose

Pin-eyed Primrose

Pin-eyed Primrose

Pin-eyed Primroses

Pin-eyed Primroses

to feed on the nectar at the bottom of the flower-tube, the position of the anthers/ pollen ensure that they can only pollinate a flower of the opposite arrangement. So, the butterfly gathers pollen from a Pin-eyed on the part of the body that ensures it pollinates a Thrum-eyed and vice versa. This ensures cross pollination. (Apologies for the recent break in transmission- trouble with my blog site!), Conditions: After a hot, sunny day yesterday, today was cloudy, showery and cooler. Temperature: Max11- Min 6c.

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