27th February 2016

Ringed Plover– to round up the small waders we saw in the North East- the Ringed Plover. Present all year round on sandy and shingle coasts, the breeding numbers of these lovely birds are declining- they are now on the Red List. Ringed Plovers breed on shingle, and are therefore very vulnerable to disturbance. Like other Plovers, including the Lapwing, the adults appear injured and trail a wing, flying away from the nest or young to lure predators away. UK numbers are swelled in winter by overwintering birds from Europe. They often feed in mixed flocks- there is one in the flock here, among Dunlin, visible from its darker head and wing-bar. Conditions: A cool, still, dry spell. Temperature: Max 4- Min 1c.

One Ringed Plover among a flock of Dunlin.

One Ringed Plover among a flock of Dunlin.

Ringed Plover

Ringed Plover

Ringed Plover

Ringed Plover

IMG_7425

25th February 2016

Dunlin- after a few days away without the computer, here’s another wader seen on our trip to the north east, and one that can be seen on most of our coasts, feeding along the receding or incoming tide-line. These Dunlin are in their less colourful winter plumage. Dunlin breed on inland uplands but overwinter in flocks, sometimes numbering thousands. They roost on marshes and fields, feeding on worms, insects and snails both there and along the shore. They have dark, slightly down-curved bills. Their back-markings and pale undersides are worth getting familiar with as they swoop and dive in flight. Conditions: Bright, dry days and frosty nights. Temperature: Max 5- Min 3c.IMG_6972

Dunlin in flight

Dunlin in flight

Dunlin- winter plumage

Dunlin- winter plumage

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16th February 2016

Sanderlings- After waiting for all the dog-walkers to leave a small, sandy beach in the North East the other day, the beautiful Sanderlings swooped in and started their fast and furious feeding along the sea edge. Sanderlings visit many of our sandy beaches during winter, and are easy to identify in their white and grey winter plumage, with black bill and legs. They are sometimes in mixed flocks with other waders. Sanderlings fly off in spring, to breed in the High Arctic. Conditions: Cold wind and bright sunny day. Temperature: Max 5- Min 3c.IMG_7200IMG_7352IMG_7419IMG_7359

14th February 2016

Short Eared Owl- on our last day in North Tyneside we were exceptionally lucky to see a Short Eared Owl, watchful on a fence, in an area of rough grassland. There have been five along that stretch of coast this winter

Short Eared Owl

Short Eared Owl

Short Eared Owl

Short Eared Owl

Short Eared Owl

Short Eared Owl

Short Eared Owl

Short Eared Owl

but sadly, through the wet and rough weather, two were found dead. Short Eared Owls mostly hunt during the night and evening but also during the day. The numbers of these beautiful, big. yellow-eyed owls have declined significantly lately. We had seen one briefly at Druridge Bay earlier in the week but this one was beside a well-used footpath, in full view of many admiring people, as dusk crept in. What a wonderful sight. Conditions: Sunny, with occasional flurries of light snow. Temperature: Max 5- Min 0c.

13th February 2016

Eider Ducks in Budle Bay: the UK’s heaviest and fastest-flying duck, this sea duck comes to many Northumbrian and Scottish coasts in February, for breeding. Hunted almost to extinction in the late 19th century, they have built back up but are on the amber list. They feed on crustaceans and molluscs. Their favourite, Mussels, they swallow whole. The strong muscles in their gizzards break the shells down. They are long-lived, the oldest known being 22. Some farmers in Iceland still gather their down from nests for eponymous ‘eider downs’. St Cuthbert, the 7th century monk,  protected them by law, on the Farne Islands, one of the earliest known acts of formal conservation. For this

Female Eider

Female Eider

Male Eider

Male Eider

Male Eider

Male Eider

Male Eider

Male Eider

Male Eiders

Male Eiders

they are known locally as St Cuthbert’s or Cuddy’s Duck. Conditions: The bright, dry spell continues. Temperature: Max 6- Min 3c.

11th January 2016

A camouflaged Snipe and a rarity at Druridge Bay Pool-The Snipe was resting down in the reed stalks and, so cryptic is its plumage, that we wouldn’t have seen it if a kind birdwatcher hadn’t pointed it out. We were lucky to watch the Long Billed Dowitcher, which should by rights be at home in Mississippi. Apparently, many twitchers have filled the hide only to look out on an empty pool, while we managed an almost empty hide and a good sighting of the rare Dowitcher ((distant I’m afraid so very fuzzy photos). Conditions: Two gloriously sunny days in the north east. Temperature: Max 5- Min0c.

Long Billed Dowitcher- they 'feed like sewing machines'!

Long Billed Dowitcher- they ‘feed like sewing machines’!

Long Billed Dowitcher

Long Billed Dowitcher

Spot the Snipe

Spot the Snipe

Snipe camouflaged and at rest

Snipe camouflaged and at rest

9th February 2016

Male Stonechat

Male Stonechat

Male Stonechat

Male Stonechat

Stonechat- female

Stonechat- female

Stonechat- female

Stonechat- female

Stonechats- in the North-East today I was lucky to be watching Rooks, feeding on cow-pats (!) when a pair of Stonechats turned up to enjoy the insects feeding on the ‘pancakes’ (it is Shrove Tuesday!). In the Robin family, but slightly smaller with a comparatively large head, male and female Stonechats differ, as you can see in the photo’s. They largely overwinter in the UK, though they suffer if its very cold. Breeding twice or three times a year, their numbers recover pretty well and this mild winter they are doing well. Conditions: Cold wind and mainly dry. Temperature: Max 5- Min3c.