4th November 2015

Chestnutting- One of my best early memories is of going to the local woods to gather bags and bags of chestnuts every autumn, and I did it again the other day. Sweet Chestnut trees, introduced to the UK by the Romans from their native southern Europe, seem to have a good crop this year.  The lovely, deeply fissured trunks, which twist and spiral when they grow old, are also a delight. The biggest girth ever recorded for any tree was a Sweet Chestnut, recorded in Sicily with a girth of a staggering 204 feet (62 metres)! While I love eating the nuts raw or roasted, they have been ground for flour and even ground for starch for laundry in parts of Europe. Conditions: A cool and dry, cloudy day, a little more seasonal following exceptionally warm

The toothed leaves of Sweet Chestnut turn beautiful colours in autumn

The toothed leaves of Sweet Chestnut turn beautiful colours in autumn

The best Chestnuts to peel and eat raw are those with white bases

The best Chestnuts to peel and eat raw are those with white bases

The central tree here is a Chestnut. Their barks, smooth and grey when young become deeply fissured as they age

The central tree here is a Chestnut. Their barks, smooth and grey when young become deeply fissured as they age

Ripening Chestnuts a bit earlier in the autumn

Ripening Chestnuts a bit earlier in the autumn

weather. Temperature: Max 11- Min 9c.

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