12th September 2015

Ash die-back is, sadly, spreading out, by air-born spores, since its first appearance in the UK in 2012. These are shots from my last trip to Sussex, showing the tell-tale signs of shrivelled, blackened leaves and shoots, and saplings with dead tops, the first time I’ve spotted it down there. My Woodland Trust magazine tells me today that it is in Northumberland. This is particularly worrying since last year there were few examples in the north. The Peak District will be vulnerable since, while Ash is the third most common species of tree in the UK it is the dominant species on Limestone. The Woodland Trust notes Ash has genetic variation so they are researching specimens that may have resistance to the disease. They have an app for the reporting of Ash die-back if you should see it. Conditions: Heavy rain giving away to blue skies by early evening. Temperature: Max 13- Min 11c

A Coal Tit sits on an ash sapling that has Ash die-back.

A Coal Tit sits on an ash sapling that has Ash die-back.

Ash dieback

Ash dieback

Ash dieback

Ash dieback

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