29th August 2015

Orb spider-webs: Orb webs have existed for at least 100 million years, as evidenced by remains found in Early Cretaceous amber in Sussex and I saw these on my last morning in Sussex. The process of building orb webs is so complex I can only precise it here: The spider casts a thin thread into the air across a gap and when it adheres to a stem, strengthens it several times by walking across it laying down more thread. It then makes a y-shape, and adds the radials to this. They it works on non-sticky spirals so it can manoeuvre without getting stuck itself, before laying down sticky spirals which trap the insects. Commonly, spiders eat their webs each morning as the stickiness does not last and they need to recoup some of the protein they have expended in the web itself. Conditions: Fairly cool and cloudy. Temperature: Max 18- Min13c.

Orb web.

Orb web.

Orb spider-web

Orb spider-web

Other sorts of webs completely entangled the Blackberries

Other sorts of webs completely entangled the Blackberries

The very heavy dew and low sun highlighted a field full of various spiders-webs.

The very heavy dew and low sun highlighted a field full of various spiders-webs, which were virtually invisible as the sun rose and the dew evaporated.

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27th August 2015

Common Fleabane: This beautiful and often overlooked flower, as beautiful as a garden flower, is to be found at this time of year in all but the very north of England, and Scotland. It thrives in damp areas and ditches, spreading by rhizomes to form large patches when in ideal conditions. Its name tells the story- it smells pretty acrid and it was used as an insect-repellant, hung in bunches in houses, or burned to drive out infestations of fleas. The foliage is grey-green and downy and the flowers form a valuable source of late summer nectar for many species of butterfly, being the primary nectar source for the Small Copper. Conditions: In the south a supposedly dry day was actually infiltrated by heavy showers and lovely, late rainbows. Temperature: Max 17- Min 12c.

Common Fleabane

Common Fleabane

Common Fleabane in a damp corner of a field

Common Fleabane in a damp corner of a field

This wild member of the daisy family is as dramatic as any garden flower

This wild member of the daisy family is as dramatic as any garden flower

Fleabane, flowering in late summer, is a good source of nectar.

Fleabane, flowering in late summer, is a good source of nectar.

26th August 2015

Ruddy Darter: There are several similar-looking Darter dragonflies, which all rest on vegetation, scanning for prey and rivals, which it zips off at speed to catch or chase away. This is the gorgeous but less common Ruddy Darter, local in South East England, though extending its range more recently. You can distinguish the Ruddy Darter from the Common Darter by its all-black legs and wings, and the ‘waist’ broadening to a club-shaped abdomen. The female Ruddy is smaller and golden-yellow, though I haven’t spotted one yet. They like ponds with dense vegetation, like the one nearby. Conditions: The 40 mph gusts and absolutely torrential rain has returned down in

IMG_0832

Ruddy Darter- they rest with their wings forward and move off at great speed

the SE, with hail due and no respite till early evening. Thank goodness the harvest is in down here. Temperature: Max 18- Min 14c.

The Ruddy Darter has a 'waist' shape and dark wings and legs

The Ruddy Darter has a ‘waist’ shape and dark wings and legs

25th August 2015

Holly Blue Butterfly- This pale Blue butterfly is common in parks and gardens (including ours in Sheffield), but due to the fast way it flits about higher than other Blues, it is hard to photograph. Females have wide, dark bands on the upper wing and both male and female have tiny, black spots on the underwings. Holly Blues have two broods in the south and one in the north (they rarely appear in Scotland), but their

Holly Blue

Holly Blue

Two Holly Blues feed on the inconspicuous flowers of Snowberry

Two Holly Blues feed on the inconspicuous flowers of Snowberry

The dark rim of this Holly Blue means it is a female.

The dark rim of this Holly Blue’s upper wing means it is a female.

Listrodomus Nicthemerus, the wasp that parasitises the Holly Blue caterpillar.

Listrodomus Nicthemerus, the wasp that parasitises the Holly Blue caterpillar.

numbers vary widely from year to year. It is thought this is due to the parasitic wasp, which I saw in the same patch- Listrodomus Nicthemerus. This wasp lays its egg only in the larvae of the Holly Blue. Holly Blue caterpillars and adults feed on several plants, including Snowberry, as they are here,  Bramble and Ivy. Conditions: Sun giving way to  more heavy rain. Temperature: Max 18- Min 17c.

24th August 2015

Clearwings- back down South after a few busy days, and it is raining in torrents so I thought I’d post this day-flying moth I saw last time I was in Sussex. I don’t ever remember seeing anything like it before and still can’t decide which of the 15 species of Clearwings it is. The most common Clearwing is the Currant Clearwing though even this is declining and hard to find, apparently. This could be the Currant Clearwing but I’m not sure. (Those wonderful moths, the Hummingbird Hawk Moths are also clearwings). Many Clearwings, like this one, have evolved to look like Wasps, as a means of deterring predators. Conditions: A cloudy day becoming extremely wet, as were a couple of recent days in Sheffield! Temperature: Max 18- Min 13c.

A Clearwing, a day-flying moth evolved to look like a Wasp.

A Clearwing, a day-flying moth evolved to look like a Wasp.

Clearwings often have intricate patterns on their wings

Clearwings often have intricate patterns on their wings

19th August 2015

Charms of Goldfinches, or as they were appropriately named in Anglo-Saxon times, ‘Thistle-tweakers’, are flitting through the garden at present, up to 15 at a time, and competing to get on the feeder together. Some adults are in moult, as you can see from the photo. The young, sometimes called ‘grey-pates’ as they lack the red head of adults, also have a speckled chest. Conditions: Sun, with cloud building and rain coming in for the evening. Temperature: Max 20- Min 14c.

Young Goldfinch are also known as 'grey-pates', lacking the brightly coloured heads

Young Goldfinch are also known as ‘grey-pates’, lacking the brightly coloured heads

The chests of young Goldfinches stay speckled for most of the summer.

The chests of young Goldfinches stay speckled for most of the summer.

Adult Goldfinch in moult

Adult Goldfinch in moult

The Charm compete for access to the sunflower seed kernels they love so much

The Charm compete for access to the sunflower seed kernels they love so much

18th August 2015

Young Goldfinches and Bullfinches have been learning the hard way the last few days. Some, like this juvenile Goldfinch, have been begging to be fed, by fluffing up their chests, moving their tails up and down, cheeping and fluttering their wings very fast. Earlier in the season this would have stimulated the adults to feed them, but lately they have been studiously ignored, turned away from and are, what looks like, being told to get on with it themselves. This little one was so desperate it turned, unsuccessfully of course! (Juveniles have the yellow wing pattern but not the black, red and white head markings). Conditions: Cloud with some showers,and a cool breeze. Temperature: Max 17- Min 14c.

A young Goldfinch displays begging for food

A young Goldfinch displays, begging for food, while the adult turns resolutely away deliberately ignoring it.

Another juvenile flies in and the first one displays again

Another juvenile flies in and the first one displays again

However desperately if displays it has no effect

However desperately if displays it has no effect

 

The adult has enough and vocalises before flying off!

The adult has enough and vocalises before flying off!