10th November 2014

The ancestor of all our domestic Geese, the Grey Lag is easy to see in parks, estuaries, marshes, or on lakes throughout the UK. However, many of the Grey Lags that breed here come from deliberately re-introduced stock, aimed at rebuilding the population and so behave in a fairly tame way. Despite these reintroductions, they are on the amber list. The really wild ones are found either in Scotland all year round, or among the over-wintering geese which arrive by their thousand from September- March. During breeding, Grey Lag Geese are very territorial  but once their young are fledged they become sociable, often bringing up the goslings in large groups together.  Lynn Truss should like them, since they eat shoots and leaves- (and roots!) Conditions: milder, still, dry day. Temperature: Max 11- Min 10C.

A Grey Lag Goose in typical, aggressive teritorial mode, hissing and threatening another adult goose.

A Grey Lag Goose in typical, aggressive territorial mode, hissing and threatening another adult goose.

Typically, a small flock of Grey Lag Geese take off from feeding on grass.

Typically, a small flock of Grey Lag Geese take off from feeding on grass.

A Grey Lag Goose

A Grey Lag Goose

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