2nd November 2014

Sulphur Tufts grow everywhere in the UK and are one fungus it’s quite easy to identify. It is NOT edible! Sulphur Tufts, so named because they grow in big groups and have a yellow centre to their caps, which fades over time, appear between April and the first

A typical display of Sulphur Tuft, the colour fading into late autumn

A typical display of Sulphur Tuft, the colour fading into late autumn

Sulphur Tuft fungi massed on a dying tree-trunk

Sulphur Tuft fungi massed on a dying tree-trunk

Sulphur Tuft, an inedible fungus, showing the stronger colouring near the centre of the cap

Sulphur Tuft, an inedible fungus, showing the stronger colouring near the centre of the cap

heavy frost. They are saprotrophic, meaning they feed off rotting material, and if they appear in numbers on either conifer or deciduous trees it is a sure sign the tree is dying. They can also appear far from a tree or stump, feeding off the underground root system, or even on wood-chippings you spread on the garden. Sulphur Tufts feed from the softer wood material and when that is consumed they are replaced by fungi which can decompose the harder lignin that remains, which is why there may be hundreds for a year or two before they disappear to crop up on another dying stump. Conditions: The unseasonal warm spell seems to be over, but it is still quite mild and bright for November. Temperature: Max 13- Min 8 C.

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