24th October 2014

Returning to Redshank, as these are some of the easiest waders to identify and can be seen round most coasts in winter, and inland in the breeding season. As their name suggests they have bright red, almost orange legs, the same colour as the first part of their bill. Their breeding numbers are reducing so they are on the amber list but their numbers increase hugely over the winter, swelled especially by thousands migrating from Iceland. They feed on worms, Crane Flies (Daddy Longlegs), small crustaceans and Molluscs. As well as being visually easy to pick out, their piping calls, higher pitched and

Common Redshank

Common Redshank

Common Redshank in summer

Common Redshank in spring

A pair of Common Redshank at breeding time

A pair of Common Redshank at breeding time

more ‘alarmist’ than the haunting Oyster Catches, are an easy way to tell they are around. The calls act as a warning to other waders, as their common name, ‘Sentinel of the Marsh’ and their Welsh name “Pibydd Coesgoch’ also indicate. A couple of years ago we were also lucky to see this much rarer relativeĀ Speckled Redshank. A few overwinter and e saw this one in April in Titchwell, Norfolk. Conditions: A cooler-feeling day with sun and cloud. Temperature: Max 14- Min 7C.

Spotted Redshank, a winter migrant.

Spotted Redshank, a winter migrant.

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