30th September 2014

Travelling today so I’m just posting a depiction of some of the autumn fruits and seeds that are ripening now. There’s a devastating report out today saying that most species in the world have halved their population during the past 40 years- truly terrifying. Conditions: A cloudy day with sunny intervals. Temperature: Max 19- Min 12 C.autumn seedsautumn seeds text

29th September 2014

This is a busy time of year for migration of many birds and other species, giving us the chance to see wintering species arrive as well as losing many we love, like Swallows and Swifts. Many migration details are only coming to light with modern technology and the development of light-weight tracking devices. The Painted Lady butterfly, for example, which comes north to the UK in summer in huge numbers, sometimes as many as 11 million of them arriving from the Mediterranean region, was for many years thought to die off in autumn. Radar tracking has now revealed that they fly back to Europe but at such heights- around 1,000 metres– that they couldn’t be seen migrating by eye! Many waders migrate here, swelling resident populations, to feed on our estuaries, (like the Godwits, with their very long bills). Some waders, such as Little Gulls, just stop off to feed, and some stay all winter. This is not surprising as 1 square kilometre of estuarine mud produces 200,000 kCal of food in a year. Probably the most awe-inspiring migration story of the lot is the Arctic Tern which in a lifetime is thought to travel further than any other creature. Travelling 20,000 miles from the Antarctic, and then back again, it has been calculated that some individual Arctic Terns will have travelled one and a half million miles in it’s lifetime, as far as to the moon and back 3 times! Conditions: A duller day with showers and cloud. Temperature: Max 18- Min 12 C

An Arctic Tern, probably the most extraordinary example of migration in the animal world.

An Arctic Tern, probably the most extraordinary example of migration in the animal world.

Arctic Terns come here to breed in summer from the Antarctic.

Arctic Terns come here to breed in summer from the Antarctic.

A beautiful Painted Lady butterfly, which migrates to and from the Mediterranean each year.

A beautiful Painted Lady butterfly, which migrates to and from the Mediterranean each year.

A Godwit, one of the waders whose numbers are swelled in winter, through in-migration.

A Godwit, one of the waders whose numbers are swelled in winter, through in-migration.

28th September 2014

Oak Trees are host to 30 different types of gall wasps and you may have been seeing these strange growths in the trees or under them recently -in fact, on our Oak there seem to be more acorn-cups distorted by these than have matured as acorns this year- good news for the parasitic wasps that cause these ‘Oak Nuts’ or, more accurately ‘Knopper Gall Wasps’. Like other galls (e.g. Oak Apples, Oak Marbles– which we used to call Oak Apples!) they do not usually harm adult trees much but they can drastically reduce the Acorns for food for Jays etc in years like this. The larvae that hatch from eggs laid in the

A few of the already hatched gall cases- you can see the acorns have failed to develop, and the hole left by the emerging Wasp.

A few of the already hatched gall cases- you can see the acorns have failed to develop, and the hole left by the emerging Wasp.

A Robin's Pincushion, the growth of the Gall Wasp that lays its eggs on the Dog Rose.

A Robin’s Pincushion, the growth of the Gall Wasp that lays its eggs on the Dog Rose.

forming acorn emerge as tiny Wasps from

An acorn distorted by the Knopper Gall Wasp

An acorn distorted by the Knopper Gall Wasp

 you can see the hole they have emerged from in the photo’s. The Robin’s Pincushion is a Gall of several larvae that each have a chamber inside the ‘Pincushion’. These are quite common on their hosts, Wild  (Dog) Roses at this time of year. They larvae feed on the host plant through the winter and then emerge as adults in spring. They reproduce by Parthenogenisis, not needing a male, and the cycle starts again. Conditions: Yet another still, dry and mostly sunny day in this incredible late summer spell. Temperature: Max 21- Min 14 C.

27th September 2014

Fly Agaric are probably the best known fungi or toadstools, and widely known to be poisonous. In the Aminata family, they are related to the much more dangerous Death Cap and Destroying Angel fungi! Fly Agaric are not quite so toxic, but can make you very sick. They have been used in the past, in Europe, broken into milk, as an insecticide- it has recently been found that they contain isotonic acid which is both attractive to, and toxic to insects!. Fly Agaric also have a long history, especially in Siberia, of being used as an hallucinogen for religious and shamanistic rituals and Patrick Harding, the local naturalist, makes a good case in his lovely book, ‘Mushroom Miscellany’, for their link to the Father Christmas myth, the red and white suit, and the story of him ‘flying’. The spots, and the white ‘skirt’ on the stalk of fully grown specimens are the remains of a white cover or ‘veil’ which covers the fungi as it emerges from the ground. Like many fungi, this one is mycorrhyzal, meaning it has a mutually beneficial relationship with the trees it grows near (it particularly favours birch). It helps the tree to absorb minerals and water, while the tree helps the fungus access carbohydrates. Conditions: Another lovely, still autumn day, with sun and light cloud. Temperature: Max 17- Min 11 C

A newly emerged Fly Agaric toadstool, with the remains of the white veil showing as the classic white spots.

A newly emerged Fly Agaric toadstool, with the remains of the white veil showing as the classic white spots.

Fly Agaric, showing the gills under the cap.

Fly Agaric, showing the gills under the cap.

Mature Fly Agaric in the shade of the trees they have a symbiotic relationship with

Mature Fly Agaric in the shade of the trees they have a symbiotic relationship with, showing the ‘skirts on the stalks.

Fly Agaric are often nibbled- it is thought the hallucinogen's may affect the creatures that eat them

Fly Agaric are often nibbled- it is thought the hallucinogen’s may affect the creatures that eat them

26th September 2014

The Water Vole, our most endangered native mammal, is in the news today. The largest native vole by far, ‘Ratty’ of Wind in the Willows,  has been recorded in the Highlands of Scotland for the first time for 20 years, which is really good news. The Scottish Water Voles are of different genetic origin than those found in England and Wales! Both came after the Ice Age, the Scottish ones from Northern Iberia and the others from S E Europe. The escaped and ‘liberated’ non-native Mink are thought to be a key reason for their decline, as well as the loss of habitat along their favourite ditch and river banks. They feed on grasses and waterside plants and their burrows can be detected by the ‘mown’ appearance of grass outside the entrance-holes! They are brilliant swimmers and can swim as far as 500 metres on the surface or 15 m underwater. They have  several other good tricks up their sleeves to evade predators like Mink and Otter- they kick up mud from the stream floor to create a smokescreen if chased, and have several burrow entrances to make escape more likely. Water Voles also build  burrows on several ‘floors’ to help survive flooding along the streams and ditches. They live in small family groups but only live for 5 months. Water Voles can, however, have a new litter only 22 days after a previous one and the young, weighing in at 5g at birth, start growing fur after a few days and are fully grown and weaned at 14 days! We used to see them regularly when we were young but I had to get up early and sit for a while along the River Derwent, near Hathersage, to photograph this one a couple of years ago. Conditions: Still and dry, with quite a lot of sun. Balmy autumn days at the moment.

'Ratty' the Water Vole, on the River Derwent

‘Ratty’ the Water Vole, on the River Derwent

Water Vole, just popped up from a swim across the Derwent

Water Vole, just popped up from a swim across the Derwent

Temperature: Max 17- Min 8 C.

25th September 2014

Swags of Black Bryony berries can be seen at this time of year, draped through hedgerows in many parts of the country. They may look tempting but all parts of the plant are poisonous, containing saponins and histamine, making them extreme irritants, too. Unrelated to the White Bryony (more another time), Black Bryony is our

The distinctive 'ace of spades' shaped , dark glossy leaves of Black Byony

The distinctive ‘ace of spades’ shaped , dark glossy leaves of Black Bryony

The inconspicuous flowers of Black Bryony, some beginning to form green berries .

The inconspicuous flowers of Black Bryony, on shoots from the climbing stalks .

only native member of the Yam family. The shoots grow up in spring, twining like vines through branches of other hedgerow plants but they are only really conspicuous

Black Bryonies red berries form as their leaves yellow and fall.

Black Bryony’s red berries form as their leaves yellow and fall.

Long necklaces of Black Bryony berries adorn hedgerows long after all their leaves have dropped.

Long necklaces of Black Bryony berries adorn hedgerows long after all their leaves have died.

when the berries turn from green to red. The flowers, too, are less obvious- small greenish-yellow six-petalled flowers among the dark, glossy, heart-shaped leaves. The name may come from the darkness of the leaves, or from the near-black tuber, which was endowed in ancient times with magical powers,  probably due to the hallucinogenic properties of its toxins. Following the ancient European belief in the magic powers of Mandrakes roots, and due to no Mandrakes growing in Britain, White Bryony was known and used in traditions such as Wicca, as a substitute Mandrake, and Black Bryony as a Womandrake. Conditions: A cool, dry and cloudy day with a gentle breeze. Temperature: One of those unusual days when the night and day temperatures are stable, Max 16- Min 16C.    

24th September 2014

Conkers are falling out of the sky now! Horse Chestnut Trees, not native to the UK, can live to be 300 years old. Their sticky buds come in early spring (the sticky sap protects them from frost) and the candelabra flowers in May provide pollen and nectar for many insects, especially bees. The leaves are also the food plant for Triangle Moths and leaf-miners, which lead to the familiar white patches that appear sometimes. Scrunched up in a bit of water, the leaves also produce a mildly antiseptic soap which is handy if your out and get a bit muddy! Horse Chestnut is sometimes used in Shampoos. When the leaves start to change colour and fall, as they are already, look for the inverted horse-shoe-shaped scar (with what looks like nail-holes) they leave on the stem- this

One of the first trees to turn to autumn colours, the Horse Chestnut fruits, Conkers, are ripe now.

One of the first trees to turn to autumn colours, the Horse Chestnut fruits, Conkers, are ripe now.

A Conker's slightly prickly case

A Conker’s slightly prickly case

This Horse Chestnut case has fallen recently and has just opened to reveal the beautiful, shiny Conker encased inside.

This Horse Chestnut case has fallen recently and has just opened to reveal the beautiful, shiny Conker encased inside.

may give rise to the name of the tree. The best thing, of course, is the slightly prickly fruit-cases which house gorgeous shiny, mahogany-coloured Conkers. These are slightly toxic but used to be ground up and given to horses to treat coughs, which may also explain the name. The well known game of Conkers, a name thought to derive from “Conch’ (the game thought to have first been played with shells) is the best known thing about them and the first record of it being played is on the Isle of Wight in 1848 though surely it has been played longer than that. Conditions: Some run overnight ad a col, dry day with some sun. Temperature: Max 16- Min 11 C.