5th July 2014

A couple more moths I’ve identified from recent moth-watching evenings- the Brimstone Moth is another beautiful yellow moth that is relatively common in gardens, woods, and grasslands which occasionally flies during the day, but mostly at night. The definitive identification mark is the white dash surrounded by brown on the forewing. The caterpillar of this moth mimics a twig and is hard to find, but feeds on a range of leaves- birch, willow, sloe, rowan, amelanchier and currants. Though it is widespread in the UK, it only has one brood in the north. From the sublime to the rather ridiculous, the other one is called the Snout Moth, and it’s easy to see why! This moth flies between June and August and the apparent long ‘nose’ is actually long ‘palps’ or mouth parts which extend forwards. Conditions: Overnight and early morning rain easing to a fine, warm day. Temperature: Max 19- Min 13 C.

Snout Moth

Snout Moth

Snout Moth showing the forward-projecting palps or mouth-parts that give it its name..

Snout Moth showing the forward-projecting palps or mouth-parts that give it its name..

Brimstone Moth

Brimstone Moth

Brimstone Moth

Brimstone Moth showing its definitive marking of a white dash surrounded by brown on its forewing.

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