23rd June 2014

Damselflies are voracious predators of insects, both in the underwater larval stage and the adult stage. They can easily be distinguished from Dragonflies, as Damselflies fold their wings against  their bodies when at rest, while Dragonflies rest with their wings open. Two common forms visit our garden and ponds: the Large Red and the Common Blue Damselfly, both very widespread either near slow-flowing or still water, also making feeding-forays into gardens and grasslands away from water. The Large Red Damselfly has black legs and black and red bands on its thorax, (unlike the Small Red which has reddish legs, a red body and is much less common). The female Large Red tends to have more black or even some yellow bands on its thorax. The Common Blue Damselfly is by far the most frequently seen of all Damselflies and often visits gardens, with or without a pond. The female is paler, or greenish, as can be seen in the photo. The empty nymph-skin could be from either species. Conditions: The hot, dry spell continues. Temperature: Max 22- Min 14 C.

The Large Red Damselfly

The Large Red Damselfly

The male (blue) and female (greenish) Common Blue Damselfly in tandem position, during pairing (They can fly in this position).

The male (blue) and female (greenish) Common Blue Damselfly in tandem position, during pairing (They can fly in this position).

Empty larval case of Damselfly.

Empty larval case of Damselfly.

 

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