March 31st 2014

One of my favourite spring flowers, the Wood Anemone, introduced to the garden a few years ago, is well out now. In the wild they are an indicator species for ancient woodland but sadly they are getting less common as less woodland is being managed as coppice. As well as their beautiful white flowers, sometimes with lilac tints, they are a good early food source for many insects, especially hoverflies which in turn are so good at eating aphids. Wood Anemones spread by underground rhizomes so once you have a few you can easily dig up some roots and transplant them into a shady, damp part of the garden, even in the shade of buildings. Wood Anemones are also known as ‘Moonflower’ and ‘Smell-fox’ (because the leaves smell musky, apparently!). They hang their heads in dull weather, only to straighten their stems and face skyward like hundreds of stars, when the weather brightens. The flower segments are tepals, not petals and vary in number from 6-8 or, rarely, up to 10.

Wood Anemone, head hanging down in dull weather.

Wood Anemone, head hanging down in dull weather.

 

Wood Anemones, face up to the sun, above the dark green leaves.

Wood Anemones, face up to the sun, above the dark green leaves. Some with 6 and some 7 tepals.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s